Wednesday, August 28, 2013

HOA Foreclosures in Las Vegas - Part 2


There are four primary scenarios encountered as we pursue clear title on a property:
  1. Our attorney pursues quiet title on the home in an attempt to get a 100% free and clear title on the property that is marketable, can be insured, and allows us to resell the home at any time.  Although it is not the norm, there have been many cases when this method has worked and the buyer of the HOA delinquent receivables has walked away with a free and clear title from the quiet title procedure.  Since many investors are buying these HOA receivables at 5-10 cents on the dollar, when quiet title does occur, it generates a huge return on investment.
  2. If a lending institution still holds a lien (1st or 2nd mortgage) on the home, a second strategy is to hold onto the home to generate cash flow for as long as possible while the bank tries to foreclose on the property.   If properties are bought at a low enough price, and the foreclosure is not completed quickly (as they usually are not,) there is a very good possibility that this will end up being a positive return situation for our investor client.  In addition to rents collected, the probability of receiving the majority of the investment back from the bank during negotiation is also very strong.  The bank may have to pay the investor the super priority lien amount plus the overage of what was paid at auction.  If this is the case, the investor receives all of their money back, less the rehab costs, plus any rental cash flow generated during the foreclosure process.   This seems to be what most investors are banking on and are now starting to bid properties up to 20% of the property’s value at these HOA auctions.
  3. The third scenario is one that has generated personal success for my clients and I and one which I believe will become the most profitable and prevalent of all.  Once an investor has possession of the home, and has hired an attorney, it becomes very costly and time consuming for the bank to battle to get their home back.  If the bank were to foreclose on the home, their goal would be to eventually list and sell the home anyway.  So why not sell the home to the investor that currently has possession of it?   We have successfully negotiated with the bank through our attorney to buy a home at 70% of BPO.  On this particular home, the client had only put a little over $4000 into the purchase.  This $4000 includes the cost of the lien at auction, rehab, maintenance, management for a year, and attorney's fees less the rental proceeds from the months the home was rented.  The bank agreed to sell the home to our investor for $84,000 and the home is worth about $145,000 in today’s market. 
Another example of the benefits of having a good attorney can be seen in a recent transaction where our client purchased liens for two condos and after negotiation the bank simply wrote off and completely released their liens on the properties.  In that case it appeared that the bank understood that it wouldn't be economically beneficial for them to fight and spend upwards of $30,000 in legal fees for a $50,000 condo. 
As you may have gathered from trying to understand this new form of investing, there is a tremendous upside to it and very little downside based on current legislation, court cases, and history that we have seen so far.  I have personally been involved in approximately 30 of these transactions and have sold around 50 others to my client base of investors. 
If you are interested in learning more about the HOA foreclosure process and how you can use it to generate returns, please give me a call directly and I can answer any and all questions you might have.  I can also describe in detail how we are able to partner with investors to buy these homes, townhomes, and condos at 5-20 cents on the dollar and manage them effectively while getting the maximum return out of each home that we obtain, manage, or sell. 

1 comment:

  1. Don't let a foreclosure stop you from buying a new home. See Comstock if you have a buyer in need. They have a flexible credit loan. This program assists homeowners who have recently been through a foreclosure, short sale or have recently emerged from bankruptcy.

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